Thats-fabric-title

I see the world in great detail, but unlike my hyper-realistic painter counterparts I choose to express my subjects in sculpted, 3D, fabric vignettes. As you may have guessed, all my work involves intense hand sewing, but the final form is finessed with fire. That’s right, in my world fire and fabric are friends.

I have developed my own finishing technique that allows me to achieve a natural suppleness to my final forms – fire sculpting. Fire as used with fabrics, particularly synthetics, is a bit like alchemy changing a once soft material whose natural inclination was to fold and drape into a rigid material that will hold it’s fold or drape forever.

Where-do-you-title

All my fabrics have been upcycled from their original purposes. The majority were clothing and most often were designer labels. Some I acquire when friends clean out their closets, but most I get by scouring the ‘mercados’ in my home town, San Miguel de Allende, Mexico.

Several times a month you can find me at our local ‘Tianguis’ digging through piles of clothing on scores of market tables. It is there that I find the majority of my fabrics. Everything from suede to silk and most top-name brands including Tahari, Calvin Klein and Ann Taylor, just to name a few. The cost per piece? Most are under one US dollar. If these gems don’t fit me (after all a girl needs clothes), they are cut, singed, painted and transformed into sculptures.

How-did-you-title

My shift to textiles as a medium for my art happened much later in life. The man of my life asked why I had never looked to textiles as an art medium. Good question. I grew up in a family filled with seamstresses, quilters and crafters; I had been working with fabric and sewing since early childhood; the Fashion Institute of Technology in New York was my chosen campus for university; and yet here I was mid-thirties denying textiles as an art medium? Yep, that was an eye opening moment.

It was that ‘ahh haa’ moment that freed me artistically. It shifted my focus from a two-dimensional surface into the land of high texture and multidimensional forms. I had always desired to create in that space, but a connection with traditional sculpture media had eluded me. Fabric and textiles, on the other hand, well, they were close friends and now we were about to get much closer.


BIO


“This cheeky iguana cups and captures the spirit of the Mayan legend. A fantastic take on the bizarre bra.”

– Sir Richard Taylor, WETA Workshop Founder & judge for World of WearableArt™, regarding “aBRAcalypse Now”


Permanent Collections:

The Huberman Collection

World of WearableArt™ Historic Collection


Education: BA, Fashion Institute of Technology, New York, 1992

Exhibits:

2016: WOW – World of WearableArt™, New Zealand, “Hope for the Breast” exhibited

2014-2018: WOW – World of WearableArt™ Exhibition World Tour
Perc Tucker Regional Gallery | Townsville, Australia
Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum | Honolulu, Hawaii
EMP Museum | Seattle, WA
Peabody Essex Museum | Salem, MA

2012: World of WearableArt™, New Zealand, “aBRAcalypse Now” awarded Runner Up for the WETA Award

2012: Magenta Gallery, Group Show, San Miguel de Allende, MX

2011: Infinity Art Gallery, Political and Social Art Exhibit 2nd Place for El Árbol de las Lamentaciones (The Wailing Tree)

2011-2013: Off the Wall, WOW™ exhibit New Zealand museum tour

2011: World Textile Art Organization 11th Biennial of Contemporary Textile Art, Recyclability Salon, Museo Centro de las Artes de San Agustín, Oaxaca, Mexico

2010: World of WearableArt™, New Zealand, “Prickly Heat” awarded Commended World of WearableArt™ & Classic Car Museum Bizarre Bra® Section

2010: Projekt 30 Exhibition 2010: Upstream People Gallery

2010: Oasis, San Miguel de Allende, MX


BIO


“This cheeky iguana cups and captures the spirit of the Mayan legend. A fantastic take on the bizarre bra.”

– Sir Richard Taylor, WETA Workshop Founder, regarding “aBRAcalypse Now”


Permanent Collections:

The Huberman Collection

World of WearableArt™ Historic Collection


Education: BA, Fashion Institute of Technology, New York, 1992

Exhibits:

2016: WOW – World of WearableArt™, New Zealand, “Hope for the Breast” exhibited

2014-2018: WOW – World of WearableArt™ Exhibition World Tour
Perc Tucker Regional Gallery | Townsville, Australia
Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum | Honolulu, Hawaii
EMP Museum | Seattle, WA
Peabody Essex Museum | Salem, MA

2012: World of WearableArt™, New Zealand, “aBRAcalypse Now” awarded Runner Up for the WETA Award

2012: Magenta Gallery, Group Show, San Miguel de Allende, MX

2011: Infinity Art Gallery, Political and Social Art Exhibit 2nd Place for El Árbol de las Lamentaciones (The Wailing Tree)

2011-2013: Off the Wall, WOW™ exhibit New Zealand museum tour

2011: World Textile Art Organization 11th Biennial of Contemporary Textile Art, Recyclability Salon, Museo Centro de las Artes de San Agustín, Oaxaca, Mexico

2010: World of WearableArt™, New Zealand, “Prickly Heat” awarded Commended World of WearableArt™ & Classic Car Museum Bizarre Bra® Section

2010: Projekt 30 Exhibition 2010: Upstream People Gallery

2010: Oasis, San Miguel de Allende, MX


BIO


“This cheeky iguana cups and captures the spirit of the Mayan legend. A fantastic take on the bizarre bra.”

– Sir Richard Taylor, WETA Workshop Founder, regarding “aBRAcalypse Now”


Permanent Collections:
The Huberman Collection • World of WearableArt™ Historic Collection


Education: BA, Fashion Institute of Technology, New York, 1992

Exhibits:

2016: WOW – World of WearableArt™, New Zealand, “Hope for the Breast” exhibited

2014-2018: WOW – World of WearableArt™ Exhibition World Tour
Perc Tucker Regional Gallery | Townsville, Australia
Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum | Honolulu, Hawaii
EMP Museum | Seattle, WA
Peabody Essex Museum | Salem, MA

2012: World of WearableArt™, New Zealand, “aBRAcalypse Now” awarded Runner Up for the WETA Award

2012: Magenta Gallery, Group Show, San Miguel de Allende, MX

2011: Infinity Art Gallery, Political and Social Art Exhibit 2nd Place for El Árbol de las Lamentaciones (The Wailing Tree)

2011-2013: Off the Wall, WOW™ exhibit New Zealand museum tour

2011: World Textile Art Organization 11th Biennial of Contemporary Textile Art, Recyclability Salon, Museo Centro de las Artes de San Agustín, Oaxaca, Mexico

2010: World of WearableArt™, New Zealand, “Prickly Heat” awarded Commended World of WearableArt™ & Classic Car Museum Bizarre Bra® Section

2010: Projekt 30 Exhibition 2010: Upstream People Gallery

2010: Oasis, San Miguel de Allende, MX


CRITICAL PRAISE


“Wendy Moyer shows textile art in a professional manner. Perhaps most successful is her piece “Flor de la Noche” with the black behind the night flower strengthening the subject. The hand stitching adds a nice touch to the simple and direct statement.”

– Laurence Bradshaw, Professor of Art, University of Nebraska Omaha
Upstream People Gallery

“El Árbol de las Lamentaciones (The Wailing Tree) – The thorns of a cactus tree are brutal, painful to remove, and leave long lasting scars. Wendy Moyer masterfully creates in a simple, yet powerful form, the disturbing representation of the brutality and abuse these women suffer. Even with the reminder of the womens’ beauty (the flowers) and their undamaged life before (the garments), you are still left with the everlasting and painful image of the torn bodies and psyches of these women. The “familiar image” of these rape trees along the borders of our countries, is appalling-they stand as trophies of indifference and disdain.”

– Julie Weismann, Infinity Art Gallery

“Ms. Moyer took a lifetime of learning from generations of artisans in her family and turned it into an award-winning garment, taking the Commended Award in the World of WearableArt™ and Classic Cars Bizarre Bra® Section. Moyer’s entry, “Prickly Heat”, plays on the nurturing bosom of motherhood by creating a cacti-covered garment alluringly coloured and flowering, but adorned with sharp barbs. Using recycled clothing to cut the shapes needed for her garment, Moyer’s history is as colourful and abundant as her concept of Mother Nature’s “nourishing breasts”. Her own creativity was nourished by a family of seamstresses, painters and artists, and her transition from artist to designer is a story essence of the Montana WOW® Awards.”

– Excerpt from World of WearableArt™ Winners 2010 press release

HERSTORY

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How I got here. I was born into a family rich in traditions of sewing, quilting and crafting. My maternal grandmother, Miriam, was a professional seamstress. I remember you could hardly see the machine in her sewing room amidst the stacks of fabrics left from client alterations. She never threw out even the smallest amount of fabric because “you never know when you might need it.”

From these remnants came clothes in miniature for all the 5¢ and 10¢ dolls she collected from garage sales and flea markets – just one of her hobbies. The polyester and other synthetic scraps often ended up in some version of a crazy quilt. They were not always the nicest to look at but they were made with a consciousness for recycling and love for her family. Miriam made sure all her kids could sew, including the boys. She felt it was a basic skill necessary to daily life and all of her children used that skill in one form or another.

My mom is a great crafter and seamstress in her own right. She spun from her mother’s teachings a talent for crocheting, knitting and needlepoint. She made a business of crafting painted wooden home accessories and even learned the arts of dyeing, felting and spinning from the wool of her pet sheep. She is a women of many talents (far too many to list here) which all started when her mother taught her to sew.

I benefited greatly from those skills which were passed from generation to generation. Initially, it meant I could have a Day-Glo purple bedroom complete with bedspread and curtains with appliquéd stars and moons or a Holly-Hobby dress with matching bonnet. Hey, I was four and it was the early 70’s!

My mom could make anything! At age four my imagination never exceeded my mother’s crafty limitations (if she had any limitations). By the time my feet could barely touch the power pedal of the sewing machine (propped up on a box) she was teaching me that I, too, could make anything.

My dad’s mother was a painter of ceramics. She began painting ceramic figurines of bunnies dressed up for Easter but soon her true talent for replicating wildlife emerged. She would study animals from photos, television shows and wildlife magazines, taking note of their unique coloring and markings so that her next lion cub or elephant would look more realistic. Through her painted world, my grandmother taught me to see all the details that are often taken for granted.

I was actively drawing and creating on a daily basis by the time I was a preteen. At that point I was fortunate enough to be taken under the wing of our neighbor who was a commercial illustrator. She saw potential in my sketches but I think most of all she saw an eager kid wanting to learn more. She taught me all about good composition and technique. I explored new mediums and soon I was creating stuff that moved from the front of the refrigerator to a frame.

Now I had a path. I was an artist. Every elective credit in school was art – printing, pottery, painting and eventually culminating with an independent study course in art, designed by my teachers.

I entered State University of New York (SUNY) and decided on liberal arts with a fine art emphasis. It was in the middle of printing class, among the banter that filled the room, that someone mentioned “starving” and “artist” in the same breath. Up until that point the thought had never really occurred to me. That small thought filled my mind and changed my path from artist to designer. After two years in fine art I transferred to the Fashion Institute of Technology (FIT) campus in New York City. The artist in me was being redefined as a graphic designer and marketer. Despite the shift in paths I was still within skill sets I knew instinctively … my comfort zones of fabric, sewing and creation. Three years later I received a BA in Advertising Design and Marketing. I was not going to be a “starving artist.”

I hit the streets of Madison Avenue and did some short stints at Young & Rubicam, Ammirati & Puris and Wunderman before finding a better fit within magazine publishing. Unlike the big firms at the time, publishing companies allowed me to work within, and eventually oversee, creative marketing departments. My teams and I were able to do everything within the creative process, not just one small aspect.

Eventually it led me to open my own small agency but despite my successes in marketing, I never completely fit into that commercial mold. So early on, I created a rather successful side business in decorative painting to fulfill the artist within.

In 2003 I left it all behind and moved to Mexico. I’ve been exploring various media, drawn initially back to the instructions of my professors, my commercial artist mentor and even farther back to my roots in fabrics. I’m back on a path I never completely stepped off. Only now, I’ve combined all my skills as a designer, illustrator, painter and sculptor with my first inherent skill – sewing.

Now, I love what I do.

HERSTORY

How I got here. I was born into a family rich in traditions of sewing, quilting and crafting. My maternal grandmother, Miriam, was a professional seamstress. I remember you could hardly see the machine in her sewing room amidst the stacks of fabrics left from client alterations. She never threw out even the smallest amount of fabric because “you never know when you might need it.”

From these remnants came clothes in miniature for all the 5¢ and 10¢ dolls she collected from garage sales and flea markets – just one of her hobbies. The polyester and other synthetic scraps often ended up in some version of a crazy quilt. They were not always the nicest to look at but they were made with a consciousness for recycling and love for her family. Miriam made sure all her kids could sew, including the boys. She felt it was a basic skill necessary to daily life and all of her children used that skill in one form or another.

My mom is a great crafter and seamstress in her own right. She spun from her mother’s teachings a talent for crocheting, knitting and needlepoint. She made a business of crafting painted wooden home accessories and even learned the arts of dyeing, felting and spinning from the wool of her pet sheep. She is a women of many talents (far too many to list here) which all started when her mother taught her to sew.

I benefited greatly from those skills which were passed from generation to generation. Initially, it meant I could have a Day-Glo purple bedroom complete with bedspread and curtains with appliquéd stars and moons or a Holly-Hobby dress with matching bonnet. Hey, I was four and it was the early 70’s!

My mom could make anything! At age four my imagination never exceeded my mother’s crafty limitations (if she had any limitations). By the time my feet could barely touch the power pedal of the sewing machine (propped up on a box) she was teaching me that I, too, could make anything.

My dad’s mother was a painter of ceramics. She began painting ceramic figurines of bunnies dressed up for Easter but soon her true talent for replicating wildlife emerged. She would study animals from photos, television shows and wildlife magazines, taking note of their unique coloring and markings so that her next lion cub or elephant would look more realistic. Through her painted world, my grandmother taught me to see all the details that are often taken for granted.

I was actively drawing and creating on a daily basis by the time I was a preteen. At that point I was fortunate enough to be taken under the wing of our neighbor who was a commercial illustrator. She saw potential in my sketches but I think most of all she saw an eager kid wanting to learn more. She taught me all about good composition and technique. I explored new mediums and soon I was creating stuff that moved from the front of the refrigerator to a frame.

Now I had a path. I was an artist. Every elective credit in school was art – printing, pottery, painting and eventually culminating with an independent study course in art, designed by my teachers.

I entered State University of New York (SUNY) and decided on liberal arts with a fine art emphasis. It was in the middle of printing class, among the banter that filled the room, that someone mentioned “starving” and “artist” in the same breath. Up until that point the thought had never really occurred to me. That small thought filled my mind and changed my path from artist to designer. After two years in fine art I transferred to the Fashion Institute of Technology (FIT) campus in New York City. The artist in me was being redefined as a graphic designer and marketer. Despite the shift in paths I was still within skill sets I knew instinctively … my comfort zones of fabric, sewing and creation. Three years later I received a BA in Advertising Design and Marketing. I was not going to be a “starving artist.”

I hit the streets of Madison Avenue and did some short stints at Young & Rubicam, Ammirati & Puris and Wunderman before finding a better fit within magazine publishing. Unlike the big firms at the time, publishing companies allowed me to work within, and eventually oversee, creative marketing departments. My teams and I were able to do everything within the creative process, not just one small aspect.

Eventually it led me to open my own small agency but despite my successes in marketing, I never completely fit into that commercial mold. So early on, I created a rather successful side business in decorative painting to fulfill the artist within.

In 2003 I left it all behind and moved to Mexico. I’ve been exploring various media, drawn initially back to the instructions of my professors, my commercial artist mentor and even farther back to my roots in fabrics. I’m back on a path I never completely stepped off. Only now, I’ve combined all my skills as a designer, illustrator, painter and sculptor with my first inherent skill – sewing.

Now, I love what I do.

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